Basic facts about hazmat:

The term “hazmat” is an abbreviation for “hazardous materials.” Typically, these include materials that may pose a reasonable threat to health, property or the environment. Hazmats come in all shapes and sizes such as solid, liquid, gas or a combination of the three. Often, hazmats appear in the form of dust, fumes, gas, vapor, mist or smoke.

When you hear the term “hazmat,” it’s hard not to picture thick green slime oozing out of a rusty barrel bearing a large “WARNING” label. While this can be one Hollywood representation, there is a wide-reaching range of hazmats. In fact, hazmats include a broad range of materials from nuclear waste products to common household objects such as paints, air fresheners or glue.

Although a person may not come across hazmats every day, hazardous materials are routinely used and stored in warehouses and are transported on highways, railroads, waterways and pipelines.

Hazard Communication Program

Due to their dangerous nature, it is vital to communicate safety and awareness when working with or around hazmats. As such, employers must implement a hazard communication program, which provides workforces information about the characteristics and properties of the hazardous materials on their job sites.

The hazard communication program provides technical guidelines, appropriate guidelines associated with personal protection equipment (PPE) and medical surveillance guidelines. Detailed information should be available for workers at any time, including labels and safety data sheets. Employees must complete comprehensive training to handle materials safely and properly to work with/around hazmats. Additionally, training includes knowledge of emergency response in case of emergency. 

Examinetics services for Hazmat

Due to their dangerous nature, it is vital to communicate safety and awareness when working with or around hazmats. As such, employers must implement a hazard communication program, which provides workforces information about the characteristics and properties of the hazardous materials on their job sites.

 

References

OSHA Safety and Health Topic: Hazardous and Toxic Substances

Business Owner Briefing 

Medical Director Review 

National Ocean Services

Enviromental Health and Safety

 

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This is business-to-business information intended for EHS (environmental health and safety) professionals and not intended for the final consumer. Companies should check the local regulatory status of any claim according to their individual needs, requirements and intended use.